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Chwilio fesul cyfnod allweddol isod neu defnyddiwch blwch offer i athrawon am gymorth gyda sgiliau digidol a'r Fframwaith Cymhwysedd

Ysbrydli'r Ymdrech - Printiau'r Rhyfel Byd Cyntaf Cover Image Favourites Icons A vector image of a heart to represent a Favourite Item
Ysbrydli'r Ymdrech - Printiau'r Rhyfel Byd Cyntaf

Gwybodaeth am brintiau trawiadol a drefnwyd gan Fiwro Propaganda Rhyfel y Llywodraeth yn 1917. Dewch o hyd i ddolenni yma i ddelweddau digidol o'r printiau, a gweithgaredd digidol.

Bywyd ar Ffrynt y Gorllewin Cover Image Favourites Icons A vector image of a heart to represent a Favourite Item
Bywyd ar Ffrynt y Gorllewin

Llyfr rhyngweithiol am fywyd ar Ffrynt y Gorllewin yn ystod y Rhyfel Byd Cyntaf. Dilynwch y dolenni er mwyn gweld lluniau sydd yn cael eu cynnwys yn y llyfr o gasgliadau'r Llyfrgell Genedlaethol ac Amgueddfa Cymru, a gwrthrychau o gasgliad yr Amgueddfa.

John Piper - Mynyddoedd Cymru Cover Image Favourites Icons A vector image of a heart to represent a Favourite Item
John Piper - Mynyddoedd Cymru

Darganfyddwch dirluniau dramatig gogledd Cymru. Astudiwch baentiadau John Piper, ei dechnegau a lleoliadau gan ddefnyddio'r adnodd addysg a'r llyfryn gweithgareddau.

Cyfrif Pennau Cover Image Favourites Icons A vector image of a heart to represent a Favourite Item
Cyfrif Pennau

Pa fath o bobl oedd yn byw ac yn gweithio yn Abertawe yng nghanol y bedwaredd ganrif ar bymtheg?

Robeson yng Nghymru Cover Image Favourites Icons A vector image of a heart to represent a Favourite Item
Robeson yng Nghymru

Beth yw lincs rhwng Paul Robeson a Chymru?

Picedi, Plismyn a Gwleidyddiaeth Cover Image Favourites Icons A vector image of a heart to represent a Favourite Item
Picedi, Plismyn a Gwleidyddiaeth

Cynllun pedair gwers i’w defnyddio gan ysgolion uwchradd, sy’n esbonio cefndir, digwyddiadau a chanlyniadau Streic y Glowyr 1984-5. Mae'r casgliad yma hefyd yn cynnwys lluniau yn ymwneud â'r streic

Dargafnod Hanes Lleol Trwy'r Archifdy Lleol Cover Image Favourites Icons A vector image of a heart to represent a Favourite Item
Dargafnod Hanes Lleol Trwy'r Archifdy Lleol

Defnyddiwch yr adnoddau yma er mwyn eich helpu gyda archwilio hanes lleol trwy ddefnyddio'r archifdy lleol

Y Satwrnalia: gwrthrychau wedi eu dewis gan... Cover Image Favourites Icons A vector image of a heart to represent a Favourite Item
Y Satwrnalia: gwrthrychau wedi eu dewis gan...

Daeth y disgyblion yma o Somerton Primary School i Amgueddfa Leng Rufeinig Cymru fel rhan o Ddiwrnod Meddiannu Kids in Museums, 2016.Cymerwyd yr awenau ganddynt er mwyn dweud hanes y Satwrnalia, sef gŵyl a ddathlwyd o'r 17eg o Ragfyr am bum diwrnod er mwyn diolch i'r duw Sadwrn. Crëwyd y fidio yma ganddynt wedi iddynt ei sgriptio a'i ffilmio. Aethant y tu ôl i'r llenni yn yr Amgueddfa hefyd i ddarganfod gwrthrychau Rhufeinig, ac yna dewis a thynnu lluniau o'r eitemau er mwyn ychwanegu at stori'r Satwrnalia.

Hanes y Satwrnalia, fel adroddir yn y fidio gan... Cover Image Favourites Icons A vector image of a heart to represent a Favourite Item
Hanes y Satwrnalia, fel adroddir yn y fidio gan...

Y stori y tu ôl i'r fidio a grëwyd gan Somerton Primary School.

Interview with Molly Curley, one of the... Cover Image Favourites Icons A vector image of a heart to represent a Favourite Item
Interview with Molly Curley, one of the...

An oral history interview with Molly Curley, a founding member of Craft in the Bay and the Makers Guild in Wales, 18 September 2016. --------------- The Chronicle Project is a community heritage project supported by the Heritage Lottery Fund and run by VCS Cymru with the aims to document the history of volunteering in Cardiff, from 1914 to 2014. Visit our website at: http://chronicle.recueil.net/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/chronicleVCS/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/vcs_chronicle --------------- Molly: Yes. Hello! My name’s Molly Curley, I’m currently a potter and I’m quite ancient. I’m not gonna tell you how old. Um, but I was born in Cardiff and grew up in Cardiff, was educated here, ended up at the art school in Cardiff specializing in book illustration and then doing a teaching course after which I taught arts and crafts and eventually ceramics at various high schools, ending up in Cardiff High School for 16 years where I ended up teaching nothing but ceramics, which I got into almost by accident. I never trained as a potter, but then I took early retirement to be a potter. And before that we’d lived in Cambridge for 3 years and then in Birmingham for 5 years so for 8 years I was not in Cardiff, but the rest of my life I have been here. Did a bit of teaching in Solihull, but I was a bit busy having 4 children, so I started back teaching when we got back to Cardiff and that was at Cardiff High School. I took early retirement to be a potter and then of course the problem with being a crafts person is that you couldn’t find a market for your work. That probably is more important than making the stuff because it piles up quite quickly if you’re a potter. So in those days – this was in the early 1960s – there were lots of craft fairs around and every weekend there was a craft fair somewhere in South Wales and we’d go to ones in Cardiff and Cowbridge and Brecon sometimes, as far away as that and things like that. Some of them were good, some of them were not very good, but sort of tatty, no quality control. And it got worse, in the end craft fairs became more like jumble sales, almost. A few of us got together [who] were making what we thought [was] good quality stuff and we thought perhaps we can run our own craft fairs and select who we wanted to show in them. So we did – we started the guild. Five of us started it off: a woodturner, a jeweller, a paper maker, a weaver and myself. And we spread the word around. We still went to craft fairs, we had to. We spread the word around amongst other craftspeople and they got interested and eventually we had about 20-odd who were interested enough to turn up to a meeting in Cardiff to talk about forming the guild [1984]. We did that, we formed a committee and I came home as chairman, to my astonishment. And I was the chairman for the first year, which was very formative. One of the members – her role on the committee was to do the marketing and to accept exhibitions and things like that for us. Amazingly she got an exhibition in a design centre in Cardiff, which is no longer there, but it was a very nice gallery near the New Theatre in Cardiff. We had our inaugural exhibition there and there was a press call in the morning and the local paper, The Western Mail and Echo, turned to report it. The BBC were there with their cameras. I had to do a bit of camera about what we were about and it went out on the six o‘clock news – which I thought “Wow”. It wouldn’t happen today, but it did then. And the next day I had two phone calls: one from a manager of a department store in Cardiff inviting us to have a display in his china department – which we did; and another from a little potter that I knew that ran her own little shop in Cowbridge. A tiny little shop, it must’ve been the smallest shop in Wales, I should think. She’d given up potting and she had it empty for 5 years so she offered it to us. And we opened a shop in Cowbridge, about 10 of us. And one of the members, she was a leatherworker, designed all the stands, which were sort of hold-up affairs. And we had a stand each around this tiny little shop. There was no loo, there was no kitchen. We were there for about 23 years altogether. In the end it sort of diminished. We ran it as a cooperative. But one of the things that Linda, the one who was organising events, did (the one who’d organised the first exhibition) – she went into St David’s Hall, which hadn’t long been opened, and met the director and offered to do a big craft fair one weekend in St David’s Hall, and he said yes! And we did that and it was a great success, loads of people came. By this time we were having about 4 selections a year from applicants who wanted to join the guild and we were up to about 40-odd members. We were very fussy [about] who we took. It had to be well designed well made and original, everything that people made. But all the crafts were involved and anyway, we did several of these wonderful craft fairs. We had a big banner across the road between the St David Hall and the old library which said “Makers Guild in Wales” and we used to have big pieces in the local press and the new director then, who had taken over, Michael Tearle, he was very impressed with us. And at this time they were building a new library at the bottom of The Hayes in Cardiff. It’s gone now, I think it’s where John Lewis is. But it’s gone, they built another one instead. Anyway, they built a new one, so the old library, in The Hayes in Cardiff, just opposite St David’s Hall, was going to be empty and the City Council said to Michael Tearle, director of St David’s Hall, “You think of something to do with that building.” So he thought – art gallery and crafts centre. So he phoned me one morning – I was up to my elbows in clay – and asked me to come down and walk around the building with him, which I did - washed my hands first. He offered us one room- it was quite a big room – one side of the building – I think it’s where the bar is now [Locke & Remedy]. He offered us one room, and he said we could have it for a craft centre and I said “Well let’s call it a craft gallery,” so we called it “The old library craft gallery”. We all decided “Yes, we would take it,” so we moved in that Easter and it did very well. It was in a good spot in the centre of Cardiff, we didn’t have to pay very much rent and he had the art gallery in the big lending library bit, which is now, I think, the Cardiff [Story] Museum. And it worked very well. We were there for 6 years. Then it was decided the old library, which was a bit crumbling and decaying a bit down in the basement, should be refurbished. We had to find new premises. So we went looking around. We looked down in the bay which was still Cardiff Docks, it hadn’t been developed. No Marina down there or anything like that, or Mermaid Quay. And we were offered an old tin shed. It was like an aircraft hangar. It had been an aircraft hangar I think, it was where Techniquest had just moved out of and into their big premises where they still are. So again Cardiff Bay Development Corporation who owned the building thought “What could we do with it?” so suddenly we got offered it. And we were devastated to think we were leaving the centre and coming down to the docks. But it stood in its own little car park, and opposite the fish place down there [Molly remembered the name of the place a few minutes later – Harry Ramsden’s]. We moved down, I mean it was an empty shed with steel walls. So we had to think what to do with it, and the WDA [Welsh Development Agency] were just expanding some sort of place up at Treforest and they had a lot of hessian covered screens, wooden screens, to get rid of. So we got all those and we lined the building with the hessian screens on which we could stick things up, which was ideal. And we got a grant from the Arts Council to get some of these plinths which we got here [still used at Craft in the Bay]. We got them all made and they arrived, we painted them all and eventually we opened. And it was quite a huge success, people came down, amazingly. And we were there for 3 years and we were doing very well and people were coming. We employed a manager by this time. The rest of us were all working as volunteers, helping out the manager, as we did in the old library, on a day to day basis. Some of us would do several days a month perhaps. It worked alright, seemed to. And then Cardiff Bay Development Corporation said that they were going to sell it and build all these lovely new shops and restaurants and places down there. So we had to go and again we had to look for somewhere new. And all we could find was a place at the bottom of Bute Street here, it was an office block. And it had a series of one, two, three rooms in a long line, which was not ideal, and offices upstairs. But it was all we could find, so we took it, moved in and we struggled along there for about 4 years. And during that time our chairman was a very lively lady, Kate Bosset, and she got together with the Arts Council and other people and we got quite a good grant to build our own gallery, which was this! And we used Cardiff Bay architects and amazingly it all happened. We were able to almost pay for the building which cost about a million pounds and we were offered it – because the Docks Authority owned a lot of bits and pieces around here, derelict bits from the old dockyard days. They had this little old tin shed which had been a dockside warehouse. Just behind the Pierhead building it stood and it was derelict, but it was listed, because it was the last one of its kind down in Cardiff docks. So it couldn’t be thrown away but it had to be moved because it was where they were going to build the Millennium arts centre [Wales Millennium Centre], so the Pierhead master offered it to us. So we said “Thank you very much!” And this was incorporated in the design of the building. And the original bit from the old listed building, which makes this [Craft in the Bay centre] a listed building, was all the metal work in the roof and the cut iron columns that support the roof all around the outside of the glass, which is where they were before, but the glass walls were wooden walls when it was a dockside warehouse. But the tin was mainly on the top. And the architects managed to incorporate all that and build us a nice gallery at the same time and with a little extension where we were able to have workshops and offices and the café. Which helps us to pay our overheads, because they pay us rent. And we’ve been here since 2002, which is 14 years. And our members still come and do their voluntary days, which is one of the things you have to once you become selected to the membership. And everyone comes, and if they’re in North Wales they’re only expected to do 2 days a year, but if they’re in West Wales I think they do about 4 and if they’re in Cardiff they do about 8. That’s a fair arrangement. And I think we all enjoy coming down, because it’s good to keep in touch, it’s good to meet the customers and it’s good to know how the business is going. What motivates us? Oh, it’s the desire to sell our work. Basically, we weren’t thinking of volunteering, we were just promoting ourselves. That was what it was about. Well, yes, we are a cooperative and we’re a charitable cooperative, because we do a lot. Any potential profit, which there isn’t very much of – goes towards education in the crafts and that sort of thing, and ...yeah, I think it’s been a very worthwhile project. Well trying to get the guild known about and an awful lot of people in Cardiff still don’t know about it. And getting events going and we had to write the constitution and make up the rules. And we hadn’t done this sort of thing before, any of us, so we sort of made it up as we went along. I mean the work that our members were doing was excellent and most of them are still here. One very good weaver, Anna Adam, sadly died a year or two ago, but the rest of us are still going, not so strong perhaps, but going. Simon Rich is here today, who is a potter, he makes wonderful pots. Charities – I don’t think we have done that very much, not as far as I know. I mean we have a lot to do with the Arts Council still and they’ve been very helpful over the years. I think occasionally we get a grant from other charities. I’ve always been more involved with the business aspect of the selling and the manning and all this kind of thing. I don’t think so, I don’t think I had time for that sort of thing, because I was teaching full time and I had a family of 4 kids growing up. I think the volunteering I did was toddling around at the various functions in the evenings, you know. I think it probably shows the very best of what’s made in Wales. Not the only gallery that does that I’m sure, but we must be among the most important galleries in Wales for bringing this sort of thing to the public eye. Ask the Arts Council what they think of us, you know, this is what we do. Well, I suppose so, if we weren’t here a lot of people wouldn’t be seeing this kind of thing, would they? People do just come in and gawk a bit and walk around in a bemused fashion and they’ve never seen anything quite like this before probably, but they do appreciate it, they say “What wonderful stuff” usually. Almost always. Well, I just hope that after I’ve kicked the bucket, which probably won’t be very long, somebody will carry on. I’m more or less retried off now, I do very little except the odd days stewarding. So it runs itself very well. We’ve got a fantastic manager, Simon [Burgess], and the part time managers that work with him. And Charlotte [Kingston] and Cindy [Lambert] in particular, they’re invaluable. We only have a handful of 3 full-time staff and we run this place, you know. It’s pretty good. They work very very hard. And I do appreciate them, I hope they always will. Yes oh yes, oh, I love it! I come about almost once a month, it’s 8 times a year, you see. And every time I have to be taught how to use the computer on the counter. It’s nice to catch up on how the business is going, we’re about to get solar panels on the roof and more efficient lighting inside, it can’t be bad. I think we just used to go out as individuals and participate in craft fairs and just try and talk to other crafts people there about what we were doing and try and get them interested. And I suppose we talked to the public as well, but there wasn’t anything then to tell them about until we got ourselves together. And once we got ourselves together as a group we would again try and find exhibition space or craft fair space. It was hard, very hard, because there were a few established organized craft fairs and we had to push into that market, you know. But we did, yes. I know one of the first craft fairs I ran for the guild was in my local village church hall, in Llanishen. I remember making posters and hanging them around the lamp posts. In those days you would pay to go into a craft fair, maybe 50p or possibly a pound. So we charged admission fee and loads of people came. I think we had about 16 members, with a stall each. That’s all there was room for. And my husband sat at the desk and took the money at the entrance hall. I think I charged them all 10 quid each [the people exhibiting], and that was probably 150 pounds for the hall.....no, I don’t know how much the hall cost, not very much, I think. But I think I probably put an advert in the Echo which would’ve been 100 pounds or more, it’s very expensive to advertise, it still is. So anyway I charged them all 10 quid, each stallholder 10 quid to take a stall, and we had so much money taken at the door, I was able to give them back the 10 quid at the end of the day, which is lovely. And I think I did two [crafts] like that; those were our very first ones, and then we sort of ventured further, I don’t remember where we went altogether, I really can’t.

Interview with Kate Bosset, about her... Cover Image Favourites Icons A vector image of a heart to represent a Favourite Item
Interview with Kate Bosset, about her...

Interview with Kate Bosset, a long-time member of the Makers Guild in Wales and volunteer with Craft in the Bay. --------------- The Chronicle Project is a community heritage project supported by the Heritage Lottery Fund and run by VCS Cymru with the aims to document the history of volunteering in Cardiff, from 1914 to 2014. Visit our website at: http://chronicle.recueil.net/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/chronicleVCS/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/vcs_chronicle --------------- Interviewer: So, what is your name and when were you born? Kate: My name is Kate Bosset and I first became a member of the Makers Guild In Wales in 1987. I was fortunate to be accepted (the standard of my work was good enough for them to accept me). And I have been grateful ever since, because I have been involved not only with a very high standard of work, but with people who are excellent craftspeople and very good friends. It is an extremely close-knit organisation: most of it done of course on a voluntary basis. Interviewer What motivated you to join the Makers Guild? Kate: Because I went to one of their fairs, which they used to have before they had their own premises, and I liked the standard of work that I saw and I thought “This is the kind of group that I would like to be part of.” Interviewer: When you started as part of the Makers Guild, what were your tasks, what did you have to do, what was your role? Kate: Nothing very much because we had, I mean we just organised craft fairs, mainly in St. David’s, in the concert hall, here in Cardiff. And we had very successful craft fairs there. And then the Old Library became vacant and it was mooted that we should have a permanent presence there. And I was part of that meeting and very much in favour of doing that. Now, it was extremely difficult to do because we had no money at all, absolutely none, so we all contributed, each person contributed a certain amount of money. And the rents, they were kind, it was owned at that time by Cardiff City Council and they did not charge us a great deal: they wanted the space used and we were a fairly good organisation to do this. We did employ somebody at that stage, but it was one of our own members, and the rest of us manned it all the time wholly voluntarily. Interviewer: What kind of activities would you do voluntarily in the old library? Kate: Oh, we’d do everything: we’d dust; we’d clean the gallery; we’d look after everything; we’d display it, all the artwork; and we would be salespeople when people came in. I mean, we ran the gallery as this gallery also is run, on very much the same lines. Nothing has altered in that respect. Interviewer: How would you recruit more members to be part of the Makers Guild, especially in the beginning? Kate: Oh, wholly on the excellence of their work. I mean, the craftspeople, or really they’re applied artists, because craft has a slightly derogatory meaning to it but the people here are artists and it’s a close-knit community and they soon knew that the standard that the Makers Guild asked was a high one and there was prestige in belonging to it. So we didn’t have to recruit people, they came to us. Interviewer: Before you had the space in the Old Library, how would you go about organising a craft fair? Kate: By booking the space. And we would produce the tables ourselves – often in the space the tables would be there, but we just turned up with our stuff. Interviewer: Would craftsmen have to pay for their stalls? Kate: Oh yes. Each craftsperson paid for a stall. Interviewer: Would you say that your volunteering with the Makers Guild impacted on the wider community and if so, how? Kate: Any volunteer, social volunteering impacts the wider community because you are being part of that society. I mean, alright, this was the art section of the society but any volunteering impacts the wider society. I mean, it goes without saying really doesn’t it. Interviewer: That is true, and how did Makers Guild do it? Kate: How did we do it? Interviewer: Yeah, how did Makers Guild impact the wider society? Kate: We advertised ourselves and they got to know when one of our fairs was advertised, that we would advertise that we were having a craft fair, the public came because they had faith in what we were selling. Interviewer: Could you talk more about how Makers Guild developed, so about looking for different spaces to put your gallery? Kate: Oh, that is extremely difficult and there is no point in putting a gallery in the back of beyond, you’ve got to be somewhere where there is a decent footfall. We were very fortunate because there was disappointment in the Old Library closing for us. We were not given the space. I think we were there two years or something, not much more than that, I can’t recall completely. But we were offered space down here in the Bay in the old Techniquest shed. And we knew it was temporary because the space was going to be pulled down and the space used for Cardiff Bay Development. But we were there and we made our presence felt while we were there. And it was a lovely space, it was big, it was light. We inherited all the old lighting features that Techniquest had had. And as you know, Techniquest is a splendid showpiece of science technology. And so we were there for I think another two years, maybe just eighteen months, and then we had nowhere to go, and that was just awful. But there was space available in the Cory Building at the bottom of Bute Street. This was less than desirable, it was much smaller than Techniquest, people didn’t pass by so much, it was darker. But we made do. We moved in there and we were there for some time. But during that time Cardiff Bay was being developed and so we asked The Cardiff Bay Development Corporation for premises to open up here in the Bay, because we liked the Bay and it seemed to be good for us. And it took a lot to convince them that we were professional enough to run a viable business. That was their problem. They refused to listen to us for some long time. We asked local politicians to help us and they all helped us. They could see that it was a great asset really for the Bay to have a gallery like this, a permanent gallery. And in the end, we managed to persuade Sir Geoffrey Inkin, the Chairman of Cardiff Bay Corporation, that we were pretty good, and he conceded that yes, he would see if we could have some property in the Bay, unspecified. And all the properties that we looked at that we thought were suitable to develop, they said no, someone else was coming in. And it also needed much more money than we had. And so they had an excuse to refuse us permission. And then I thought, because at the time I was chairman, so quite a bit of the negotiation fell to me (we always work as a group, always work as a group but I would travel down from where I lived in mid-Wales, two or three times a week), and it just dawned on me because there was this plot of land here. And I talked to them and they made this commercial aspect very clear that they did not consider us professional enough to take on such a project. And I had gleaned from conversations that the site on The Flourish was deemed to have no commercial value so I had an argument to put to them and they accepted. Sir Geoffrey Inkin was extremely good about this. The other person who was good to us was Alun Davies, who at the time was the Chief Executive Officer of the Associated British Ports here, and he had the ”D” shed, which was an old warehouse which had been used as a vehicle testing building, but CADW had listed it because it had a cast iron frame. They suddenly realised that they were losing a lot of the old property and the old buildings in Cardiff Bay and hadn’t noticed that they were going so they started pretty well listing everything that was still standing, and the ”D” shed was still standing. Because it was on dockside this was the property of the Associated British Ports and they had the responsibility of taking it down and noting which piece of iron belonged to which other piece of iron, in the way that old buildings are taken down in order to be reassembled. And they offered us the framework of the “D” shed. Because of that we were able to go to the Arts Council Lottery Fund and the Heritage Lottery Fund, both of them, otherwise we could never have had this built. And we went ahead with it, and we’re still here. I’m afraid that the people who said we were not professional, because mainly we were volunteers you see, none of us was paid for this, no one had a bean, not even expenses. I would come down here, I never never claimed petrol money or anything like that – I suppose the round trip was about a hundred miles or so, you know, when I came down. And it never occurred to us because our enthusiasm and our energy was such (you must recall that we were a lot younger then than we are now) that we wanted to make the project work. And I think it has. Interviewer: Could you talk more about the process of getting funding, especially in the beginning when you said you didn’t have any money? Kate: Oh, it was awful, it was absolutely dreadful, because that I think is where our lack of professional knowledge did come into it. Now then, in the funding we were able to employ somebody, and we did. We employed somebody to do the donkey work of getting the funding. He referred to us all the way along the line and he did a great deal. So in that respect we did have some … well, he’d never done it before either but at least he was paid. He was paid of course, as you well know, out of the funding nest itself, because we didn’t have the money to pay him – that was part of the application. Interviewer: Could you talk more about your role as chairman? What things would you have to do as chairman of the Makers Guild? Kate: Well you really just have to keep an eye on everything and make sure that it is running smoothly. It can be a very onerous job but the people involved are so bent on making a success of what they’re doing that it is not very difficult at all to be chairman. You are yes, a figurehead, and if somebody has to be … there was quite a role to negotiate getting the land for this building, I accept that took a lot of meetings. There was one occasion when I had levelled at me the remark that “Do you realise that you’re getting a reputation for being the (he didn’t quite use the word) stroppiest woman in Cardiff?” (but he implied it). Anyway, stroppy or no, we got the land. Interviewer: What other memories from your time with the Makers Guild stand out – happenings, or crafts or anecdotes? Kate: I think the appreciation from the public about the standard of work that is produced, and the variety of work that is produced. It is a very fine line between fine art and applied art: they cross over quite often. Interviewer: We were talking about memories of your time with the Makers Guild that stand out. Kate: Yes we were, but I don’t know where we got to really. [Interviewer: We can start over with the memories]. Please no! What impact did we have I think was what you were saying wasn’t it? [Interviewer: Impact on the community]. On the community, yes, and what gave us most pleasure. Right, well I said that the pleasure people obviously got from the standard of the work they were seeing. And I was talking about the difference between fine art and applied art. It was quite difficult also to persuade the Arts Council that craft in its best form is applied art, because they’ve got a very, very big, broad demand on their resources: there’s literature; there’s music; there’s fine art, so what they term “craft” really comes off pretty low down. They have been quite good latterly but it was very difficult to get any funding from them in the first place. They did give us, once the Lottery came into being, they did back us for Lottery funding. The fact that the Heritage Lottery fund also was involved, the fact that the Heritage Lottery Fund thought that we were worthy because we would be preserving the building in a reasonable way. That gave us strength really. Interviewer: Would you say your work as a volunteer impacted on the community here in the Bay? Kate: It’s inevitable that it did, because it wouldn’t be here if we didn’t volunteer. I mean, this place (yes, we do employ now, we can afford to employ, several people), but everybody else is a volunteer. I mean, Debbie today, whom you’ve met, and Mandy, they’re volunteering – they don’t get paid at all. In fact if your work is here you undertake to do some volunteering, it’s part of it. And it’s very good as well, it’s extremely good because when you are down here it can be a bit boring from time to time, but when you are down here you look at other people’s work, you meet other makers: it is a very good stimulus. I am very, very chary when I see somebody’s work as I go around Wales somewhere – I never say “Oh, you must apply to the Makers Guild”, because the selections are tough, I mean it’s a very high standard that is expected of an artist. But I never do it … that’s untrue, I have done it on two or three occasions when I’ve seen outstanding work, but I have said “Look, there’s no guarantee that you’ll get in but it’s worth doing”, and one or two of the people have got in on my suggestion that they should apply (because I’ve got nothing to do with … it would never have had any effect on whether they were chosen), but I notice how their work improves after they have become a member. It is purely and simply because they are rubbing shoulders with other craftspeople and they get inspiration from the standard of work they are involved with. Interviewer: Would you say volunteering impacted other areas of your life – social life, career, family life? Kate: Yes of course, because you’re not at home, you’re here, you’re volunteering. You are giving your time to something other than your life, what you’re doing. And in my case it was just wholly family life. I was older, I mean I’m old! All this was a long time ago and I was still old – I was well past retiring age when I started here. Interviewer: What does volunteering mean to you, how would you define it? Kate: To define it is difficult. I think, quite frankly, that my attitude to volunteering is that I am doing something that I enjoy doing and at the same time I’m pleased that it is perhaps benefiting other people as well: self-indulgence if you like. Because you get an awful lot from volunteering, well as you know, otherwise you probably wouldn’t volunteer. Interviewer: Did you volunteer with other groups or organisations? Kate: Oh, I’ve always done that, yes. Interviewer: Any examples that stand out right now? Kate: Sort of just normal things – Red Cross volunteering, but not in this country, abroad, in times of a certain amount of stress, I did things for other people, yes. I’ve lived a strange life. Interviewer: Would you like to talk about your Red Cross volunteering? Kate: No, that was very minimal. I mean no, because I’d be ashamed at how little it was, but that the only think I could really think [of]. But I’ve always been part and parcel of … and it certainly wasn’t here, it was in Africa and Japan and places, so it just doesn’t apply here any more. It would be wholly irrelevant. Interviewer: How do you think … do you have any words of inspiration for volunteers today? Kate: Oh, only that they would get probably more from it than they give. Interviewer: Would you say that there are maybe frustrations or disappointments during your volunteer work – what would be something that would stand out? Kate: There are always frustrations with anything you do. Not really, because you … no, you wouldn’t continue with it if you were frustrated too much. That is the big thing about volunteering work, you’re not employed – you can say “Blow you!”, and off you go if you want to. You needn’t record that! I could have used a worse word! Interviewer: Do you still keep in touch with people from the Makers Guild? Kate: Yes. I walked in today, I haven’t been here for ages and there they were, you know. Yes. It’s nice. Interviewer: Do you still steward here from time to time? Kate: No, no. Getting down here today was quite enough of an effort thank you very much. Interviewer: What kind of activities do you do now for Makers Guild, do you just display your work? Kate: No, no, I’ve stopped working. I mean, if I were to display my work here I would have to volunteer, I would have to come in two or three times a year and do my stint. I mean, you must have gleaned this from what other people have said … other people whom you have interviewed must be giving you the same story really. Interviewer: Not really, there’s always different perspectives of the same story more-or-less. Is there anything that we didn’t talk about that you’d like to add? Kate: I think I’d like to add that the local councils, local government, civic authorities generally, don’t always appreciate the energy that is available from volunteers. No volunteer works in a lethargic way and they all feel, no matter what aspect of volunteering, this of course is a particular aspect, but they all have, if you like, a mission. And they work to it and they give a lot of their thought, not just their time but they give thought and this is something that I tried to get across to Cardiff City Council and the Cardiff Bay Development Corporation when we were negotiating this land here, that they should not underestimate the energy that this group of people had. Yes, we weren’t professional in that respect, but that I think should be recognised more by civic authorities. Interviewer: Thank you very much for everything. Kate: No, thank you.

Picedi, Plismyn a Gwleidyddiaeth Cover Image Favourites Icons A vector image of a heart to represent a Favourite Item
Picedi, Plismyn a Gwleidyddiaeth

Digwyddiadau a chanlyniadau Streic y Glowyr 1984-5. Mae'r casgliad yma hefyd yn cynnwys lluniau yn ymwneud â'r streic

The RAF Technician -a life recounted by DENNIS... Cover Image Favourites Icons A vector image of a heart to represent a Favourite Item
The RAF Technician -a life recounted by DENNIS...

I've had a passion for analogue electronics all my life. When I first heard Buckley (Flintshire) resident, Dennis Thomas speak at Deeside 41 Club, I knew instinctively that we shared a curiosity about technology and its interface with human-kind. In this clip Dennis tells of his early schooling in Flintshire and his initiation into the workplace via the DeHavilland aircraft factory at Broughton (nowadays "Airbus").His career path leads to an engineering branch of the Royal Air Force at nearby Sealand (30MU) -where on one occasion Dennis volunteered for a stint as a "guinea-pig" in, what he was told, would be "physiological experiments" being conducted at Porton Down. Dennis survives. His tales of memories of the Cuban Missile Crisis -and other lighter moments which range from a case of a ticketing malfunction which saw him riding, first-class, on the railroads of the USA to a wrong-turn which found him off the beaten track in cold-war East Berlin, will follow in due course...

Gwersyll Carcharorion Frongoch Cover Image Favourites Icons A vector image of a heart to represent a Favourite Item
Gwersyll Carcharorion Frongoch

Mae'r adnoddau hyn yn cyflwyno hanes gwersyll carcharorion Fron-goch yn ystod y Rhyfel Byd Cyntaf. Cynhyrchwyd yr adnoddau fel rhan o Brosiect Addysg y Rhyfel Byd Cyntaf Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru ac Amgueddfa Cymru.

Printer Ebenezer Pears Cover Image Favourites Icons A vector image of a heart to represent a Favourite Item
Printer Ebenezer Pears

Chwiliwch 'Yr argraffydd Ebenezer Pears' i ffeindio'r fersiwn Gymraeg.

Historical sources Cover Image Favourites Icons A vector image of a heart to represent a Favourite Item
Historical sources

Chwiliwch 'Ffynonellau hanesyddol' am y fersiwn Gymraeg o'r ffilm.

Finding historical sources  Cover Image Favourites Icons A vector image of a heart to represent a Favourite Item
Finding historical sources

Chwiliwch 'Casglu ffynonellau hanesyddol ' am y fersiwn Gymraeg o'r ffilm.

Sanitation and Cholera in 1850's Swansea Cover Image Favourites Icons A vector image of a heart to represent a Favourite Item
Sanitation and Cholera in 1850's Swansea

Chwiliwch 'Glanweithdra a Cholera yn 1850au Abertawe' am y fersiwn Gymraeg o'r ffilm.

Achosion colera yn Abertawe Cover Image Favourites Icons A vector image of a heart to represent a Favourite Item
Achosion colera yn Abertawe

Cafodd y fideo addysgiadol hwn ei ddatblygu gan Amgueddfa Genedlaethol y Glannau, Abertawe, i ategu eu casgliadau a darpariaeth ar gyfer ysgolion. Mae'r fideo yn trafod elfennau o fywyd dyddiol yn Abertawe yn y 1850au.

Marwolaethau plant yn 1850au Abertawe Cover Image Favourites Icons A vector image of a heart to represent a Favourite Item
Marwolaethau plant yn 1850au Abertawe

Cafodd y fideo addysgiadol hwn ei ddatblygu gan Amgueddfa Genedlaethol y Glannau, Abertawe, i ategu eu casgliadau a darpariaeth ar gyfer ysgolion. Mae'r fideo yn trafod elfennau o fywyd dyddiol yn Abertawe yn y 1850au.

Ffynonellau hanesyddol Cover Image Favourites Icons A vector image of a heart to represent a Favourite Item
Ffynonellau hanesyddol

Cafodd y fideo addysgiadol hwn ei ddatblygu gan Amgueddfa Genedlaethol y Glannau, Abertawe, i ategu eu casgliadau a darpariaeth ar gyfer ysgolion. Mae'r fideo hwn yn trafod ffynonellau hanesyddol a ddefnyddir gan yr Amgueddfa i greu dealltwriaeth o fywyd dyddiol yn Abertawe ar adeg y cyfrifiad o 1851.

Casglu ffynonellau hanesyddol Cover Image Favourites Icons A vector image of a heart to represent a Favourite Item
Casglu ffynonellau hanesyddol

Cafodd y fideo addysgiadol hwn ei ddatblygu gan Amgueddfa Genedlaethol y Glannau, Abertawe, i ategu eu casgliadau a darpariaeth ar gyfer ysgolion. Mae'r fideo hwn yn trafod ffynonellau hanesyddol a ddefnyddir gan yr Amgueddfa i greu dealltwriaeth o fywyd dyddiol yn Abertawe ar adeg y cyfrifiad o 1851.

Glanweithdra a Cholera yn 1850au Abertawe Cover Image Favourites Icons A vector image of a heart to represent a Favourite Item
Glanweithdra a Cholera yn 1850au Abertawe

Cafodd y fideo addysgiadol hwn ei ddatblygu gan Amgueddfa Genedlaethol y Glannau, Abertawe, i ategu eu casgliadau a darpariaeth ar gyfer ysgolion. Mae'r fideo yn trafod elfennau o fywyd dyddiol yn Abertawe yn y 1850au.

Child mortality in 1850's Swansea Cover Image Favourites Icons A vector image of a heart to represent a Favourite Item
Child mortality in 1850's Swansea

Chwiliwch 'Marwolaethau plant yn 1850au Abertawe' am y fersiwn Gymraeg o'r ffilm.

Cholera outbreak in Swansea Cover Image Favourites Icons A vector image of a heart to represent a Favourite Item
Cholera outbreak in Swansea

Chwiliwch 'Achosion colera yn Abertawe' am y fersiwn Gymraeg o'r ffilm.

Frongoch Johnnie Roberts y Bala Cover Image Favourites Icons A vector image of a heart to represent a Favourite Item
Frongoch Johnnie Roberts y Bala

Hanes gan Johnnie Roberts a oedd yn fachgen 17 mlwydd oed fu’n gweithio fel gard ac yn ffreutur y gwersyll pan garcharwyd y Gwyddelod yno.

Frongoch Syniadau i Athrawon Cover Image Favourites Icons A vector image of a heart to represent a Favourite Item
Frongoch Syniadau i Athrawon

Syniadau i athrawon

Syniadau i athrawon - Saesneg Cover Image Favourites Icons A vector image of a heart to represent a Favourite Item
Syniadau i athrawon - Saesneg

Syniadau ar gyfer athrawon (Saesneg)

Frongoch yn y papurau newydd Saesneg Cover Image Favourites Icons A vector image of a heart to represent a Favourite Item
Frongoch yn y papurau newydd Saesneg

Toriadau papur newydd Saesneg am wersyll carcharorion Frongoch

Lyn Ebenezer Cover Image Favourites Icons A vector image of a heart to represent a Favourite Item
Lyn Ebenezer

Fideo am wersyll carcharorion Frongoch gyda Lyn Ebenezer