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Disgrifiad

Dyddiad: 7 Awst 1916

Trawsysgrif:

SUBMARINE SUNK.
British Trader's Exciting Fight With U Boat.

Baltimore, Saturday.—David Thomson, the captain of the British steamer Strathness, which has just arrived here, describes a battle with a German submarine near Algiers on July 15th.

“About 6 o'clock in the afternoon,” he said, the Strathness was shaken by the impact of a shell striking her amidships near the waterline. This was our first intimation of the presence of an underwater craft. Instantly our two gunners trained their gun on the submarine and began firing. I ordered full speed ahead. The submarine continued to fire rapidly and the Strathness was repeatedly hit, but no great damage was done. After nearly an hour’s fighting a shell from the Strathness struck the submarine amidships, causing an explosion. The submarine dived with her gun still on deck and her hatch open. The captain believes that he destroyed his assailant.

[The Strathness is a vessel of 4,350 tons, her owners being the Rome Steam Shipping Company, Limited (Messrs. Fisher, Olimonde and Co., Ltd.), of Glasgow.]

FOUR SHIPS SUNK.

Marseilles, Sunday.—A British cruiser arrived here to-day and landed 227 men of four ships sunk by an Austrian submarine, viz., the Greek steamer Tricoupis, the Italian mail boat Siena, and two British steamers, Tottenham and Favonian. The two latter ships were sunk while they were hastening to the rescue of the Siena.

The Tricoupis was a vessel of 2,387 tons, owned at the Piraeus.

The Siena was a steamer of 4,372 tons, registered at Genoa.

A SWANSEA TRADER.

Lloyd’s Agency reports that the steamer Mount Coniston has been sunk. The Mount Coniston was a Swansea trader, having been at the port about a month ago.

Barcelona, Sunday (received Monday).—A semaphore watchman at Cape Bagur yesterday afternoon saw a submarine stop a Greek and a British steamer and sink them twenty minutes afterwards. The crews escaped in boats, and were picked up by a Spanish steamer. After this exploit the submarine proceeded in a south-easterly direction and disappeared from view. Later the watchman learned that the submarine has sunk, seven miles from the town of Estarti Quay, the British steamer Mount Coniston without warning. Twenty-five of the crew were rescued. The captain of the Mount Coniston states he had seen the submarine that morning sink another steamer, nationality unknown, coming from Palamos. It is reported that another steamer has been sunk and the crew rescued. It is not known whether the submarine in question is Austrian or German.—Press Association.

The Mount Coniston brought a cargo to Swansea about a month ago, and after discharging it she proceeded to Port Talbot, where she took in a general cargo for Spain.

The local agents were Messrs. Harries Bros., Swansea.

ANOTHER SWANSEA SHIP SUNK.

Messrs. Harries Bros., shipowners, Swansea, have received information from the Admiralty and the captain that their steamer, the Stamfordham, has been sunk. The crew were landed at Leith on Saturday evening. The Stamfordham carried a cargo of 1,350 tons.

It will be recalled that a few months ago another steamer owned by the firm, the Alacrity, was lost with all hands.

This latest loss of Messrs. Harries Bros. reduces their steamship fleet to ten.


Ffynhonnell:
'Submarine Sunk.' The Cambria Daily Leader. 7 Awst 1916. 3.

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